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#1 2013-05-02 05:18:31

praveenkesavan
Member
Registered: 2013-05-02
Posts: 2

Solving linear equations.

I have a problem here with linear equations.

I got a set of straight lines whose slopes vary from 1 to 5 (linearly) and y-intercept vary from 0 to 100.
I have a point (x,y) whose slope is in between 1 and 5 and y-intercept is between 0 and 100. Is there any method to find the equation of line passing through (x,y) with which I can find y-intercept of that line?

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#2 2013-05-02 06:13:15

bobbym
Administrator
From: Bumpkinland
Registered: 2009-04-12
Posts: 87,237

Re: Solving linear equations.

Hi;

I have a point (x,y) whose slope is in between 1 and 5 and y-intercept is between 0 and 100.

That is extremely vague and way too general. I need more to pin down the line.


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
Of course that result can be rigorously obtained, but who cares?
Combinatorics is Algebra and Algebra is Combinatorics.

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#3 2013-05-02 16:35:39

praveenkesavan
Member
Registered: 2013-05-02
Posts: 2

Re: Solving linear equations.

Hi,

I will explain the actual problem.
I am sensing liquid level whose measured value is affected by ambient temperature change. Sensor is calibrated for a particular temperature say (TC), but the measured value shows a deviation with a change in temperature. My aim is to find the error in measurement due to change in temperature and subtract it from measured value. For this purpose I measure both level as well temperature.

To observe the behavior w.r.t temperature I fixed the actual level constant and varied temperature for the range of interest and noted down the measured value at different temperature. It follows a linear variation for that level. I repeated the experiment at different levels and I found that the slope of the straight line is different. Slope decreases with an increase in level.

In real application, I will measure both level as well ambient temperature, from which I can calculate the difference in temperature from TC. I need to know what is the error caused by this change in temperature for that particular level. If the slope of above experiments are same then it is a straight forward calculation. But the slope also changes for different levels.

Hope the issue is clear.

What would be a practical solution for this problem?

Regards
Praveen K

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#4 2013-05-02 21:33:10

bobbym
Administrator
From: Bumpkinland
Registered: 2009-04-12
Posts: 87,237

Re: Solving linear equations.

Hi;

Practical solutions are done with numbers. All the other kaboobly doo called mathematics is not.
You have given me no data to work with. I am as powerless as a shark in the desert. A picture is worth a thousand words and a table of numbers is worth 1000 pictures.

Do you have actual measurements?


In mathematics, you don't understand things. You just get used to them.
Of course that result can be rigorously obtained, but who cares?
Combinatorics is Algebra and Algebra is Combinatorics.

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