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#1 2021-05-09 11:25:26

mathland
Member
Registered: 2021-03-25
Posts: 443

Write A Linear Equation

1. A sandwich shop purchases a used
pizza oven for $875. After 5 years, the oven will have
to be discarded and replaced. Write a linear equation
giving the value V of the equipment during the 5 years
it will be in use.


2. Write a linear equation that expresses the relationship between the temperature in degrees Celsius C and degrees Fahrenheit F. Use
the fact that water freezes at 0°C (32°F) and boils at
100°C (212°F).

Question 1

Let t = years

V = 875 + 5t

Correct?

Question 2

I am thinking of the point (Celsius, Fahrenheit).

If so, this yields the following two points:

(0°C, 32°F) & (100°C, 212°F) = (0, 32) & (100, 212).

m = (212 - 32)/(100 - 0)

m = 180/100

I now use the point-slope formula.

y - y_1 = m(x - x_1)

y - 0 = (180/100)(x - 100)

y = (180/100)(x - 180)


Is this correct?

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#2 2021-05-09 14:16:35

ganesh
Administrator
Registered: 2005-06-28
Posts: 33,594

Re: Write A Linear Equation

For #2,   the relationship between the temperature in degrees Celsius C and degrees Fahrenheit F is :

Celsius to Fahrenheit:   (°C ×  9/5 ) + 32 = °F
Fahrenheit to Celsius:   (°F − 32) ×  5/9  = °C.

See the link : Temperture Conversion.


It is no good to try to stop knowledge from going forward. Ignorance is never better than knowledge - Enrico Fermi. 

Nothing is better than reading and gaining more and more knowledge - Stephen William Hawking.

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#3 2021-05-10 11:00:15

mathland
Member
Registered: 2021-03-25
Posts: 443

Re: Write A Linear Equation

ganesh wrote:

For #2,   the relationship between the temperature in degrees Celsius C and degrees Fahrenheit F is :

Celsius to Fahrenheit:   (°C ×  9/5 ) + 32 = °F
Fahrenheit to Celsius:   (°F − 32) ×  5/9  = °C.

See the link : Temperture Conversion.

Very good. Thanks for the link. Those two are familiar weather formulas.

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