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#1 2007-03-10 00:03:03

Toast
Real Member
Registered: 2006-10-08
Posts: 1,321

Small Math Grammar Question

I know that if you have an equation...
a + b = c
...a, b, and c are terms.

However, if you have the equation...
a × b = c
...would you still be able to call a, b, and c terms? Would the product of a and b mean that they are the same term?

Also, are variables ANY pronumerals representing unknown values or are they only pronumerals which constantly change.
i.e. For y=mx+c, are all variables?
i.e. For a+b=c, where Each Letter Has 1 Possible Value, are any or all variables?


Thanks.

Last edited by Toast (2007-03-10 00:28:08)

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#2 2007-03-10 00:07:06

MathsIsFun
Administrator
Registered: 2005-01-21
Posts: 7,710

Re: Small Math Grammar Question

I would say that a × b (or "ab") is a single term: Algebra - Definitions


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#3 2007-03-10 00:29:24

Toast
Real Member
Registered: 2006-10-08
Posts: 1,321

Re: Small Math Grammar Question

Oh, so would the following passage be correct?

"Or more generally, as the multiplied term did not change, the term it was multiplied by must equal 1."

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#4 2007-03-10 00:52:59

mathsyperson
Moderator
Registered: 2005-06-22
Posts: 4,900

Re: Small Math Grammar Question

For y = mx+c, x and y are variables and m and c are constants. If you want to get really technical, then x is an independent variable and y is a dependant one (because you change x but y only changes depending on what x is).

If a, b and c can only take one value each then they are all constants. Unknown constants perhaps, but constants nonetheless.

I think your sentence makes sense, but I'm not sure because I don't know what context it's in. Also, if you're constructing some kind of proof then you'd better watch out for when the multiplied term was equal to 0, because then your statement isn't necessarily true.


Why did the vector cross the road?
It wanted to be normal.

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#5 2007-03-10 00:54:40

Sekky
Member
Registered: 2007-01-12
Posts: 181

Re: Small Math Grammar Question

If you think about it

So they can't all be terms, or you've got a pretty dire definition going on there.

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#6 2007-03-10 01:03:08

Toast
Real Member
Registered: 2006-10-08
Posts: 1,321

Re: Small Math Grammar Question

Ok thanks all, what I was trying to explain was, that as F*D=F, F=/=0, then D = 1

"Or more generally, as the multiplied number doesn't equal zero and did not change, the number it was multiplied by must equal 1."

Or perhaps I should simply stick to using F and D instead of 'number' or 'term' tongue

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#7 2007-03-12 09:28:29

lightning
Real Member
Registered: 2007-02-26
Posts: 2,060

Re: Small Math Grammar Question

oh i was getting dazed


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